How to Implement Test-Driven Development

Test-Driven Development (TDD) is something I have long had difficulties with. Not because I consider it a bad concept, but found it very difficult to start doing. In hindsight it appears that the advice given in the respective books and online articles was not suitable. So here is the approach that finally worked for me.

It boils down to deviating from the pure doctrine. Instead of writing a test before starting on a new piece of code, I start with the actual code right away. Yes, that violates the core principle, although only for a while. But I have found that in most cases my understanding of the problem is still somewhat vague when I start working on it. So for my brain it is better if I do not have to split its capacity between solving the actual problem and thinking about how to devise a proper test and what all that means for the structure of the future code.

Once the initial version of the working code is there and manually validated, I do add the test. From then on I am in a position to refactor the code without the risk of breaking something. And of course this refactoring is needed because the first version of any code is never really good. While you could write “better” initial code, this would require spending more time upfront than you otherwise need for refactoring later. And it also ignores the fact that you only really understand the problem, when you have finished implementing the solution.

What I later realized was that my approach also helped me to write more testable code. But instead of consciously having to work on it, this sneaked in as a by-product of my modified way of doing TDD. For me this is a more natural way of learning and the results are typically better than following some formal approach.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *