Category Archives: Career

Why Companies Fail on Technical Careers

I cannot say how often I read in some company’s image brochure that management and expert career paths are treated equal. There must be companies on our planet where this is true, but I have yet to see it in practice. Why is that? (Unless mentioned otherwise this article is about the IT industry with a strong focus on consulting and software companies.)

In my experience the core reason is a fundamental lack of understanding from the non-technical folks that make the relevant decisions, i.e. management. They have a vague impression of techies that is often dominated by perceived social deficiencies (“They can’t look me in the eye”). While the latter is sometimes true, how can it be a measure of someone’s qualification to perform a complex technical task? And perhaps there is actually a good reason for averting my eyes. I cannot speak for others, but when I have a complicated discussion, it helps me focus all my mental capacity on the problem at hand when I look onto the table.

I would speculate that, as in so may other cases, the heart of the problem lies with mid-level management (where the details are determined) as opposed to the C-level. Taking into account the Peter principle, what does that say about middle management? Yes, this a strong simplification and it does many people injustice. I have personally met quite a few people on this level that I consider great at their job, particularly including leadership skills. But just as well did I encounter folks who cannot think out-of-the-box and blindly follow rules and processes. And it is this capability to see new ways, make realistic projections about what will (not) work, and lead by example “where no-one has gone before”.

A particularly interesting story for me was the encounter with an HR person where we talked about setting up an initiative to advance technical folks (what is often called a high-potential program). My idea was met with friendly resistance and the argument was made that contrary to management, the technical side is so much more diverse that it would be virtually impossible to have a single program. In fact this HR person seriously thought that every techie needed his or her completely individual program.

My counter argument then was that this would not be a technical program (learn programming language XYZ) but one for professional and personal development. So we talk about e.g. how to present a complex technical scenario to upper management for getting a budget approval. Or how to engage with a customer and instill confidence that a given product is the right choice to solve their business problem. And all this with being authentic and building upon the strong technical knowledge one has.

I don’t want to appear as simply bashing HR here. But the underlying problem was that assumptions had been made about what would be suitable for technical folks without ever having spoken with any of them. Would this happen the same way for management staff?

From a more abstract perspective it comes down to the fact that many decisions are made based on personal trust and relationships, rather than on processes and policies. So what is needed is that the relevant management and technical staff (on every hierarchical level) talk to each other in the spirit of equality. And here both sides fail miserably too often.

Offshoring and Knowledge Depletion

I have recently watched a very interesting presentation by Gunter Dueck (former CTO of IBM in Germany), where he talks about the future of work. When looking at how many consulting organizations structure their business, you can see a trend that seemingly high-level parts, usually the interaction with the customer and where business domain knowledge is required, stay in your own country. And those aspects that can, allegedly, be performed by less qualified people are moved to countries with lower salaries.

This may seem attractive from a cost-management point of view for a while. And it certainly works right now – to the extent possible. Because the organizations still have people locally who had been “allowed” to start with relatively simple coding tasks and grow into the more complex areas of the business. But what if those folks retire or leave? How do you get people to the level of qualification that allows them to understand the customer’s business on the one hand, and at the same time be able to have an intelligent conversation with the offshore folks who do the coding? Because for the latter you must have done coding yourself extensively.

Architects Should Code

There is a widespread notion, that developers at some point in their career evolve into something “better”, called architect. This term has the connotation of mastery on the subject, which I think is ok. What is not ok for me, is that in many cases there is the expectation that an architect’s time is too valuable for something as mundane as coding. Instead architects should develop the overall architecture of the solution.

Ok, so what is the architecture? Most people believe that some documentation (often a mixture of prose and high-level pictures) is the architecture. I would argue that this not the architecture but a more or less accurate abstraction from it. When enough work has gone into things, it may may even become the to-be architecture (but certainly not the as-is one). However, outside of regulated industries I have never seen a document that was thorough enough. A friend of mine used to work on embedded systems for car breaks where lives are at stake; and he told me some interesting stories about the testing and documentation efforts these guys take.

In my view the architecture is, by definition, in the code itself. Everything else is, I repeat myself, something that has some relationship with it. So how can an architect not be coding? You could argue that instead of doing the work him- or herself, mentoring and guiding less experienced developers is a good use of the architect’s time. For me that works fine up to a certain level of complexity. But if we talk about an STP (straight-through processing) solution, is that really something you want to give to a mid-level developer? (It would probably be an ideal piece of work for pair-programming, though.)

I do certainly not want to demean people who call themselves architects. It is a not-so-common capability to look at an IT landscape and see the big picture. Instead many people will be lost in the details. So we definitely need this this perspective! But it is a different kind of architecture, the so-called Enterprise Architecture (EA). I know folks who started as (really good) developers and are now very successful at Enterprise Architecture.

So, in closing, my core point is that the architecture of a solution and its code are basically two sides of the same coin. Everybody involved on the technical level should understand both aspects. And if the level of detail varies, depending on the official role, that is probably ok.